July 27 When History was Made

CULTUREIFY

1775 – The Second Continental Congress passed the legislation established “a hospital for an army consisting of 20,000 men.”

1789 – The first United States federal government agency, the Department of Foreign Affairs, was established now known as Department of State

1794 – Maximilien Robespierre was arrested after encouraging the execution of 17,000 plus “enemies of the Revolution”.

1816 – The battle ended when a hot shot cannonball fired by United States Navy Gunboat No. 154 exploded the Fort’s Powder Magazine, killed 275. It was considered the deadliest single cannon shot in United States history.

1861 – Union General George B. McClellan was commander of the Army of the Potomac.

1866 – After two failures, Cyrus W. Field succeeded in laying the first underwater telegraph cable between North America and Europe.

1919 – The Chicago Race Riot erupted after a racial incident happened on a South Side beach, leading to 38 killed and 537 injureded over five-days.

1940 – The animated short A Wild Hare was released, premiereing the character of ‘Bugs Bunny’.

1953 – Fighting in the Korean War ended when the United States, China, and North Korea signed the armistice agreement. Syngman Rhee, President of South Korea, refused to sign but pledged to observe the armistice.

1960 – Vice President Richard M. Nixon was nominated for president at the Republican National Convention in Chicago.

1964 – Five thousand American military advisers was sent to South Vietnam raised the total number of United States forces in Vietnam to 21,000.

1967 – In the wake of urban rioting, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed the Kerner Commission to assess the causes of the violence.

1974 – The House of Representatives Judiciary Committee voted 27 to 11 to recommend the first article of impeachment for obstruction of justice against President Richard Nixon.

1987 – RMS Titanic Inc. began the first salvage of wreckage of the RMS Titanic.

1995 – The Korean War Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C..

1996 – In Atlanta, United States, a pipe bomb exploded at Centennial Olympic Park during the 1996 Summer Olympics.

2003 – Comedian Bob Hope died.

2003 – Lance Armstrong won a record-tying fifth straight Tour de France title.

2005 – After an incident during STS-114, NASA grounded the Space Shuttle, due to an investigation of the continuing problem with the shedding of
foam insulation from the external fuel tank.

2005 – Ahmed Ressam, plotted to bomb the Los Angeles airport on the eve of the millennium, was sentenced to 22 years in prison.

Births

1752 – Samuel Smith, general, and politician (d. 1839)

1812 – Thomas Lanier Clingman, general, and politician (d. 1897)

1905 – Leo Durocher, baseball player, and manager (d. 1991)

1907 – Ross Alexander, stage, and film actor (d. 1937)

1908 – Joseph Mitchell, journalist, and author (d. 1996)

1910 – Fern Persons, actress (d. 2012)

1913 – George L. Street III, captain, Medal of Honor recipient (d. 2000)

1916 – Elizabeth Hardwick, literary critic, novelist, and short story writer (d. 2007)

1916 – Skippy Williams, saxophonist, and arranger (d. 1994)

1916 – Keenan Wynn, actor (d. 1986)

1918 – Leonard Rose, cellist, and educator (d. 1984)

1921 – Garry Davis, pilot, and activist, created the World Passport (d. 2013)

1922 – Norman Lear, screenwriter, and producer

1924 – Vincent Canby, historian, and critic (d. 2000)

1927 – Guy Carawan, singer, and musicologist (d. 2015)

1927 – Will Jordan, actor, and comedian

1927 – John Seigenthaler, journalist, and academic (d. 2014)

1928 – Joseph Kittinger, colonel, and pilot

1929 – Harvey Fuqua, singer-songwriter, and producer (d. 2010)

1932 – Forest Able, basketball player

1933 – Nick Reynolds, singer, and bongo player (d. 2008)

1936 – J. Robert Hooper, businessman, and politician (d. 2008)

1937 – Don Galloway, actor (d. 2009)

1938 – Gary Gygax, game designer, co-created Dungeons & Dragons (d. 2008)

1939 – William Eggleston, photographer, and academic

1942 – John Pleshette, actor, director, and screenwriter

1942 – Dennis Ralston, tennis player

1944 – Bobbie Gentry, singer-songwriter, and guitarist

1947 – Betty Thomas, actress, director, and producer

1948 – Peggy Fleming, figure skater, and sportscaster

1949 – Maureen McGovern, singer, and actress

1952 – Marvin Barnes, basketball player (d. 2014)

1952 – Roxanne Hart, actress

1955 – Cat Bauer, journalist, author, and playwright

1955 – Bobby Rondinelli, drummer

1956 – Carol Leifer, actress, comedian, screenwriter, and producer

1957 – Bill Engvall, comedian, actor, and producer

1959 – Joe DeSa, baseball player (d. 1986)

1959 – Hugh Green, football player

1962 – Karl Mueller, bass player (d. 2005)

1964 – Rex Brown, bass player, and songwriter

1967 – Juliana Hatfield, singer-songwriter, and guitarist

1968 – Tom Goodwin, baseball player, and coach

1969 – Triple H, wrestler, and actor

1972 – Maya Rudolph, actress

1973 – Cassandra Clare, journalist, and author

1974 – Pete Yorn, singer-songwriter, and guitarist

1975 – Shea Hillenbrand, baseball player

1975 – Fred Mascherino, singer-songwriter, and guitarist

1975 – Alex Rodriguez, baseball player

1979 – Shannon Moore, wrestler, and singer

1981 – Susan King Borchardt, basketball player

1981 – Dash Snow, painter, and photographer (d. 2009)

1984 – Antoine Bethea, football player

1984 – Max Scherzer, baseball player

1984 – Taylor Schilling, actress

1984 – Kenny Wormald, actor, dancer, and choreographer

1985 – Husain Abdullah, football player

1986 – DeMarre Carroll, basketball player

1986 – Ryan Flaherty, baseball player

1987 – Jacoby Ford, football player

1987 – Jordan Hill, basketball player

1987 – Sarah Parsons, ice hockey player

1988 – Ryan Tannehill, football player

1990 – Nick Hogan, race car driver, and actor

1990 – Cheyenne Kimball, singer-songwriter, and guitarist

1993 – Jordan Spieth, golfer

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